DAY 3, MAY 27: MARVELOUS VISIT TO CANTERBURY, HOME OF ANGLICAN FAITH

From London, England

An impromptu day trip to Canterbury

MARVELOUS VISIT TO CANTERBURY, HOME OF ANGLICAN FAITH

When Elizabeth and I woke up this morning, we had no particular plans for the day. On a spur of the moment, I suggested we take a train to Canterbury to see its magnificent cathedral, “England’s Vatican,” as I put it. Canterbury Cathedral is the home of the Church of England whose construction was started in the 6th century.

As it turned out we got that. But we also got a lot more from this day trip. Like loads of fun. Which included an impromptu dance to the music of an excellent accordion street player. And in Elizabeth’s case, a chance to taste and enjoy one of her favorite British dishes – Cornish Pasty. She had been craving it ever since we got to England.

When we left out London hotel, it was actually raining. On our train ride, the weather turned even gloomier. So I turned to my shamanic prayer asking for divine intervention as we had not taken our umbrella.

When we disembarked in Canterbury, it was still raining. We waited for a few minutes at the station before braving our walk into town. And then suddenly the rain stopped. Within half an hour, the sun showed up. The rest of the day basked in beautiful sparkling sunshine.

IMPROMPTU STREET DANCE ON HIGH STREET

The rest of the day unfolded like magic. Like when we came upon an accordion player on High St, the main drag in Canterbury. I dropped some money into his bowl. It was his first earning of the day, as it turned out.

Then Elizabeth asked me to dance. Since her hips were already swinging, I took out a camera and made a 16-sec video clip of her dancing.

Then I asked a young woman who was filming us with her own camera if she would mind doing it with mine, too. She agreed. And these two short videos are a result.

IMPROMPTU DANCING IN CANTERBURY: BOB & ELIZABETH TANGO

 * * *

IMPROMPTU DANCING IN CANTERBURY: ELIZABETH’S SOLO

* * *

IMPROMPTU DANCING IN ROME

Afterward, Elizabeth and I reminisced a little about another time, in September 2009, when we did the same at the Piazza de Fiori, that time to the music of a Gypsy band from Romania who played Tico-Tico samba for us. (see http://yinyangbob.com/Europe2009/Day8.html).

It was an interesting “coincidence,” therefore, which I just now realized. We first danced in the streets of Rome, where the Vaticanm home of the Catholic church, is based (we had visited the Vatican actually earlier that day – Sep 18, 2009). And now we also did the same in “England’s Vatican.”

What’s the meaning of this? Guess an expression of love and joy in both places. ❤

CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL

Here are some important historical facts about the Canterbury Cathedral:

The origins of Canterbury Cathedral go back to 597AD when Augustine, sent by Pope Gregory the Great, arrived on the coast of Kent as a missionary.

Thirteenth century Archbishop of Canterbury, Stephen Langton played a leading role in the negotiations preceding Magna Carta – the charter of liberties sealed by King John in 1215.

A second folio of Shakespeare’s works belongs to Canterbury Cathedral and went on special display in April 2016 to mark the 400th anniversary of the playwright’s death.

Here are now some photos of the Canterbury Cathedral, both the interior and of the exterior.

IMG_1800

This is the famous sculpture of the Green Man on the ceiling of the Huguenot Chapel:

This roof boss is facing the Green Man in the Black Prince’s Chantry in the Crypt (now the Huguenot Chapel).


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